And The Good Times Keep Rolling

More in the adventures of the Nicholes in New Orleans. Wednesday was a day of rest for us – as I was outvoted two to one to just stay around the hotel and mill around the pool. I wasn’t happy, but, I conceded, and it seems like I really needed the rest. For the most part, I just let my legs linger in the water because it was COLD (it was supposed to  be a heated pool, but whatever) while the Cellist and the Ladybug enjoyed splashing in the water.

On Thursday – we decided to find something that would provide a bit of an educational experience but also give us something to do as tourist. This is where the New Orleans African American Museum comes into play. Located in the Treme neighborhood of New Orleans (the largest and oldest surviving African American neighborhood in the city) it boasts a total of five houses that all have exhibits that you can walk to. The house was an old plantation house that was renovated into a museum. The other houses were where the slaves and servants were housed. Built in 1828-29, the house is one of five restored buildings in this Creole villa. Inside, rotating exhibits share the home with permanent displays of African bead work, masks, musical instruments, and other artifacts. While you’re there, enjoy the gorgeous grounds, courtyard, and gazebo.

The cost to get in was $7 per adult and $3 for children 12 and under. Children under two were admitted free.

Unfortunately there was no photography allowed in the houses, but I did get a picture of the outside of the main house for you all!

We were able to see only three exhibits as the other two were closed down due to renovations. The first exhibit was a combination of slave artifacts that put me in a really thoughtful mood. We were able to see promissory notes for slaves – one was worth $300 for two lives, and then we were also able to see Craigslist type postings for the sale of slaves. Except the slaves were mentioned on the bottom of the ad – even far below the oxen. The cellist had a couple of questions for us, and I found it actually hard to explain without a bit of sadness in my voice. Even though I know that we have made strides as a country, it seems like so many people are still stuck in the mindset of slavery.
We were also able to see some local art that also garnered a bevy of questions from the cellist. While the museum isn’t MASSIVE, it is still something worth experiencing in New Orleans. It certainly provided food for thought.


  1. Toshiba says:

    Okay, this is one stop that I will have to make when we go down there! I watch the HBO show Treme, so my curiosity was already piqued.

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